Harvard Business School professor Clayton M. Christensen is credited with the first use of the term ‘disruptive technology’ to describe emerging technology that unexpectedly displaces an established one.

Harvard Business School professor Clayton M. Christensen is credited with the first use of the term ‘disruptive technology’ to describe emerging technology that unexpectedly displaces an established one. 

Mobile Internet tops McKinsey&Company’s list of the top twelve disruptive technologies to transform life, business and the global economy. 

The article ‘Emerging Market Disruptive Innovations’ by Constantinos C. Markides, provides an excellent example from a historic perspective of the disruptive technology opportunity within emerging markets.  Constantinos C. Markidesa Robert P. Bauman Professor of Strategic Leadership at London Business School, BA and MA in Economics from Boston University, MBA and DBA from the Harvard Business School.

“Disruptive innovation has been credited as the strategy that led to Japan’s dramatic economic development after World War II. Japanese companies such as Nippon Steel, Toyota, Sony and Canon started out by offering inexpensive products that were initially inferior in quality to those of their Western competitors. This allowed the Japanese manufacturers to capture the low-end segment of the market. Over time they continuously improved the performance of their products and began to move upmarket, into segments that allowed them more profitability. Eventually, the Japanese companies captured most of these segments and in the process pushed their Western competitors to the very top of the market or completely out of it.”

NuMelo Technology is founded on an internalized understanding and appreciation of the opportunity for disruptive technologies within developing economic regions to leap frog beyond the incumbent technologies available within developed economic regions and become the next generation industry leaders.